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  1. Property Tax in Africa

    Status, Challenges, and Prospects
    Libros
    Junio 2017

    "This one-of-kind study is an indispensable source for academics and policy makers who seek to explore the virtues of the property tax. The relevance of this volume clearly transcends the...

  2. Financing Metropolitan Governments in Developing Countries

    Libros
    Abril 2013
    Edited by Roy W. Bahl, Johannes F. Linn, and Deborah L. Wetzel

    The economic activity that drives growth in developing countries is heavily concentrated in cities. Catchphrases such as “metropolitan areas are the engines that pull the national economy...

  3. Land Value Taxation

    Theory, Evidence, and Practice
    Libros
    Mayo 2009

    In his 1879 classic, Progress and Poverty, Henry George proposed a tax on land values to reduce social inequality, discourage real estate speculation, and promote economic development. As an...

  4. Implementing a Local Property Tax Where There Is No Real Estate Market

    The Case of Commonly Owned Land in Rural South Africa
    Libros
    Abril 2006
    Michael E. Bell and John H. Bowman

    Since 1995 the authors have worked on a series of property taxation projects in South Africa, funded in part by the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy. South Africa envisions extending value-based...

  5. Property Taxes in South Africa

    Challenges in the Post-Apartheid Era
    Libros
    Marzo 2002
    Edited by Michael E. Bell and John H. Bowman

    Editors Michael E. Bell and John H. Bowman have assembled the first comprehensive overview of the challenges of adapting property taxation to the many changes brought about by the end of apartheid in...

  6. Land Value Taxation

    Can It and Will It Work Today?
    Libros
    Enero 1998
    Edited by Dick Netzer

    Many contemporary scholars and practitioners question whether land value taxation is a serious contender as an important revenue source. But, whatever its political potential may be, economists...

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