Freely available datasets are critical for policy analysis. The Lincoln Institute’s databases enable researchers to study important land policy challenges, policymakers to understand practices in other jurisdictions, and journalists to provide context in their stories. They also promote transparency and democratize access to information.

Scenario Planning

Scenario planning is structured decision making. It can be used to understand the interconnectivity or interdependency of various urban and rural systems, anticipate unintended consequences, or educate the public on tradeoffs.

The Place Database

This data visualization tool is a map of the United States which uses the PolicyMap platform, allowing users to view the latest available data for dozens of indicators—ranging from housing affordability, to brownfield sites, to federal government spending.

Land and Property Values in the U.S.

This database contains information on the values and rents of residential properties in the United States, covering four dimensions: the ratio of rents to prices for the stock of all owner-occupied housing; values and price indexes for all land, structures, and housing in the country; values of homes, structures, and land, and land and home price indexes for 50 states and the District of Columbia; and values and price indexes for land, structures, and housing for single-family owner-occupied housing units in 46 major U.S. metropolitan areas. A key feature of this data is separate price indices for land and structures, in addition to the more common price indices for property -- land and structures combined.

Significant Features of the Property Tax®

This database provides detailed information about the property tax system in all 50 states, with descriptions of states’ property tax relief programs, tax limits, taxation of agricultural property, classification, tax rates, and much more. 

State-by-State Property Tax at a Glance

This data visualization tool allows users to compare a wide range of property tax statistics and key features of each state’s tax system. The State-by-State Property Tax at a Glance narratives summarize highlights, key features, and history of state property tax systems, and provide valuable context for the companion visualization tool.

Fiscally Standardized Cities

The FiSC Database makes it possible to compare local government finances for 150 of the largest U.S. cities across more than 125 categories of revenues, expenditures, debt, and assets, with annual data going back to 1977. The estimates account for the fact that some city governments provide the full array of local government services, whereas others share the responsibility with overlying counties, school districts, and special purpose districts.

University Real Estate Development

University Real Estate Development is an area of academic inquiry that focuses on real estate development projects, undertaken in response to the need for increased space for core university activities across 763 eligible U.S. campuses. The case studies and presentations, working papers, and publications available in this free database allow researchers, university leaders, private developers, and public agency planners to view and analyze specific land policies in local land and property markets.

Atlas of Urban Expansion

Massive urbanization is transforming our planet. In the next three decades, developing countries will double their urban population and possibly triple their land area. Most of this urban growth is unplanned, leading to global concerns about low-density sprawl and its detrimental environmental consequences – specifically, increased carbon emissions and energy use, and the loss of prime agricultural lands. This atlas provides empirical evidence that is critical for intelligent discussion of plans and policies to manage and prepare for urban expansion everywhere.

Property Tax in Latin America

Property tax has been introduced in a large majority of Latin American countries, but its structure and administration vary greatly among jurisdictions. Little data is currently available regarding the performance of property taxes in Latin America. More importantly, even the public authorities of these countries have difficulty in collecting information on the main characteristics of the systems and of the reform initiatives that are underway. In order to contribute to the organization and dissemination of information in this area, the Lincoln Institute produced this database by undertaking a study involving a comparative analysis of property tax in Latin America.